Pretty Vacant

twolightsabovethesea:

christel-thoughts:

this is what i just picked up from the grocery store. it cost $32. Thirty. two. dollars. for 1 pineapple, 2 bags of grapes, a small container of raspberries, 1 soft drink and 2/$1 nuts…. 
do you know how much junk food i could have for $32? do you have any clue how much McDonald’s you can get for $32?
stop shaming fat people poorer than you or people poorer than you in general for not eating healthier. stop lying about how cheap it is or how it’s comparable to fast food. just stop.

Access to affordable, healthy food is the key here. Without that, how are people supposed to eat a healthy diet? Unfortunately, many people do live in situations where healthy food is either not readily available or costs so much that they cannot afford it and fast food which is calorie dense but nutritionally lacking is the cheapest, most accessible food. You cannot blame people in such situations for eating what they can afford and what is actually available to them.
Of course, the items pictured above are not going to offer a good value for someone shopping on a budget. Grapes, raspberries (spoil easily so not really a good choice if you can’t afford to have your fruit spoil), and pineapples tend to be on the moderately expensive to very expensive side compared to some other types of produce. Single serve nuts, even when 2/$1 will never be as good a value as larger packages of nuts (unit price is what you’re looking for) or even bulk-aisle nuts and soft drinks like soda are much less expensive when purchased either in large multi-serve bottles or big packs of cans, not that soda is a good healthy choice or a good value if you are looking to get the most from your budget and your calorie intake. There is no way I would walk into a store and spend $32 and walk out with this stuff, not just because the grocery store I shop at has good prices (frequently a pineapple is $3 or less there, not that I buy them often) but also because I choose my food shopping by weighing cost/value and nutrition. I am in no way saying that other people have the same access to reasonably priced healthy food that I have, I just felt the need to point out what poor choices the items in this photo are grocery-budget-wise.

I’m gonna guess it’s because I’m fortunate enough to live in an area with shit tons of farms, which means I have easy access to farmer’s markets and roadside stands, but I’m amazed at how expensive food is for people. I just spent six bucks today on a bag full of produce that I’m definitely gonna get a good chunk of meals out of, plus snacks.

twolightsabovethesea:

christel-thoughts:

this is what i just picked up from the grocery store. it cost $32. Thirty. two. dollars. for 1 pineapple, 2 bags of grapes, a small container of raspberries, 1 soft drink and 2/$1 nuts…. 

do you know how much junk food i could have for $32? do you have any clue how much McDonald’s you can get for $32?

stop shaming fat people poorer than you or people poorer than you in general for not eating healthier. stop lying about how cheap it is or how it’s comparable to fast food. just stop.

Access to affordable, healthy food is the key here. Without that, how are people supposed to eat a healthy diet? Unfortunately, many people do live in situations where healthy food is either not readily available or costs so much that they cannot afford it and fast food which is calorie dense but nutritionally lacking is the cheapest, most accessible food. You cannot blame people in such situations for eating what they can afford and what is actually available to them.

Of course, the items pictured above are not going to offer a good value for someone shopping on a budget. Grapes, raspberries (spoil easily so not really a good choice if you can’t afford to have your fruit spoil), and pineapples tend to be on the moderately expensive to very expensive side compared to some other types of produce. Single serve nuts, even when 2/$1 will never be as good a value as larger packages of nuts (unit price is what you’re looking for) or even bulk-aisle nuts and soft drinks like soda are much less expensive when purchased either in large multi-serve bottles or big packs of cans, not that soda is a good healthy choice or a good value if you are looking to get the most from your budget and your calorie intake. There is no way I would walk into a store and spend $32 and walk out with this stuff, not just because the grocery store I shop at has good prices (frequently a pineapple is $3 or less there, not that I buy them often) but also because I choose my food shopping by weighing cost/value and nutrition. I am in no way saying that other people have the same access to reasonably priced healthy food that I have, I just felt the need to point out what poor choices the items in this photo are grocery-budget-wise.

I’m gonna guess it’s because I’m fortunate enough to live in an area with shit tons of farms, which means I have easy access to farmer’s markets and roadside stands, but I’m amazed at how expensive food is for people. I just spent six bucks today on a bag full of produce that I’m definitely gonna get a good chunk of meals out of, plus snacks.

 

(Source: lardypoison, via rosasanctus)

(Source: iraffiruse)

pgdigs:

1933: Primanti Bros.

It started as a sandwich place for hungry truckers and became a signature diner where you are guaranteed to learn what a quintessential Pittsburgh sammich stands for. 

Call it a belly bomb. Primanti’s Bros. sandwich is a Pittsburgh institution. You say it’s bad for you? With coleslaw, fresh grilled meat and tomatoes? C’mon… And as far as many Pittsburghers are concerned, fries are made of potatoes, and potatoes are vegetables. So, there. 

Not convinced? Well, then you must have missed the news that Primanti’s sandwich once earned a title of the best sandwich in America AND in 2010, ESPN.com ranked PNC Park as the best ballpark in the country largely because they offer Primanti’s sandwiches complete with “generous servings of roast beef, cheese, coleslaw and — this is the key — French fries all between two buns.” The reviewer wrote, “I bet Willie Stargell ate them for breakfast.”  

One more? Primanti Brothers made the list of “1,000 Places to See Before You Die in the USA.” Just do not die there due to cholesterol overdose. 

It all began in the Strip District in 1933 at 18th and Smallman as a small family business founded by one of the brothers named Joe Primanti, a Pennsylvania native. His brothers Dick and Stanley and their nephew John DePriter joined the business right away.

The signature sandwich was a Depression-era invention and this is how the composition or, as some would probably call it — the concoction, came about, according to a story allegedly told by John DePriter himself: “One winter, a fella drove in with a load of potatoes. He brought a few of ‘em over to the restaurant to see if they were frozen. I fried the potatoes on our grill and they looked pretty good. A few of our customers asked for them, so I put the potatoes on their sandwiches.” The rest, as they say, is history.”  

Primanti Bros. has been feeding Pittsburghers and visitors to the city for more than 80 years. When it opened, it served primarily the late-night crowd. First, the customers were workers who unloaded produce in the Strip; in the 1970s, the Post-Gazette called Primanti’s customers “night hawks from all walks of life.” Today, there are 17 Primanti Brothers diners in the Pittsburgh area and three locations in Florida.

For a few years, the Post-Gazette had a tradition of running “readers’ choice for the best sandwiches in Pittsburgh.” We determined that several years in a row, Primanti’s sandwiches won and our guess is that the newspaper stopped the contest due to readers’ choices, which would predictably come from Primanti Brothers’ menu.  

— Mila Sanina

(Top image: Pittsburgh policeman, Wayne Wilson, of Morningside, bites into his favorite Primanti’s Brothers sandwich, pastrami, egg, with the slaw and fries, lettuce and tomato, our readers’ choice for the best sandwich in Pittsburgh, 1993, John Heller/Post-Gazette)

OH GOD NOW I NEED ONE OF THESE IN MY BODY.

(via andreadisaster)

stilinsk1:

gininipanini:

lunchbox-philosopher:

xghoststreak:

sizvideos:

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I thought watermelon just had too much rind and that was wrong until I saw the next gif 

I didn’t know that people are mangoes and kiwis any other way. Why the fuck would you do that?

STRAWberry

Saw this on facebook the other day and seriously fell in love. This is so freaking awesome and helps eliminate waste. Definitely trying these ways from now on.

KIWI IS A GAME CHANGER!

(via twolightsabovethesea)

willkommen-in-germany:

Spaghettieis is a German icecream made to look like a plate of spaghetti. It was created by Dario Fontanella in the late 1960s in Mannheim. In the dish, vanilla ice cream is extruded through a modified Spätzle press or potato ricer, giving it the appearance of spaghetti. It is then placed over whipped cream and topped with strawberry sauce (to simulate tomato sauce) and either coconut flakes, grated almonds, or white chocolate shavings to represent the parmesan cheese. Although it is not well known outside the German-speaking world, it can be found at some gelaterias and specialty ice cream parlors, at events, and at some hotels and restaurants around the world. In Germany, most Eiscafes (ice cream palors) are run by Italian immigrants and this has a long history now - so while many other countries are just catching up on “gelato”, we’ve eaten it for generations. :) So if you’re in Germany, find an Eiscafe - they’re everywhere - and try some of the specialty flavors. It’s really, really good icecream. 

willkommen-in-germany:

Spaghettieis is a German icecream made to look like a plate of spaghetti. It was created by Dario Fontanella in the late 1960s in Mannheim. In the dish, vanilla ice cream is extruded through a modified Spätzle press or potato ricer, giving it the appearance of spaghetti. It is then placed over whipped cream and topped with strawberry sauce (to simulate tomato sauce) and either coconut flakes, grated almonds, or white chocolate shavings to represent the parmesan cheese. Although it is not well known outside the German-speaking world, it can be found at some gelaterias and specialty ice cream parlors, at events, and at some hotels and restaurants around the world. In Germany, most Eiscafes (ice cream palors) are run by Italian immigrants and this has a long history now - so while many other countries are just catching up on “gelato”, we’ve eaten it for generations. :) So if you’re in Germany, find an Eiscafe - they’re everywhere - and try some of the specialty flavors. It’s really, really good icecream. 

(via bematthe)

listoflifehacks:

If you like this list of life hacks, follow ListOfLifeHacks for more like it!

(via viivemori)

vegan-yums:

Sinless Vegan Chocolate Raspberry Tart

thanks palmipsest for showing me this c:

(Source: vegan-yums, via bematthe)

I WANT IT NOW

I WANT IT NOW

(Source: primaivy, via bematthe)